Holy Crap Cancer!

Chef Hat Over RibbonOn January 15, 2009, while Capt. Sully was performing his “Miracle on the Hudson”, I was on the phone with my doctor getting the news. He said I had Lymphoma and I needed to go for a CT scan and a biopsy. A needle biopsy of my neck did not get enough tissue for a diagnosis, so I had to back for an operation. They took a whole lymph node to test. The CT Scan confirmed enlarged lymph nodes and the biopsy refined the diagnosis. Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a rare cancer which my wife and I knew little about. As time went by, we learned much more about it and other cancers.
About 5.000 cases of Hodgkins Lymphoma are diagnosed every year and at this point in time 95% of those are cured. 1 out of 20 Hodgkins patients die from the cancer.

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10 Recommendations for Cancer Prevention

1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.

Maintaining a healthy weight is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your risk of cancer. Aim to be at the lower end of the healthy Body Mass Index (BMI) range.

Maintaining a healthy weight brings an array of health benefits. As well as making us feel better, it also means that we are less likely to develop not only cancer, but also other chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

We also know that where we store extra weight affects cancer risk. Scientists have discovered that carrying excess fat around our waists can be particularly harmful – it acts like a ‘hormone pump’ releasing estrogen into the bloodstream as well as raising levels of other hormones in the body. This is strongly linked to colon cancer and probably to cancers of the pancreas and endometrium (lining of the uterus), as well as breast cancer (in postmenopausal women).

See Recommendations 2 and 3 for strategies for weight management.

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What’s in a Number?
or How Kareem, Magic and Shaq are connected to Waverly, Melvin and Lou.

I must tell you this story and you will understand.

Coach Jack Donohue held a meeting in the spring of 1958 to introduce himself to his new team. He outlined his philosophy of the game and made sure we knew how much he looked forward to his first season as head basketball coach at Power Memorial Academy. Power had suffered through a couple of seasons with a coach who missed practices and was a no show at games while he was off playing against the Globetrotters, putting on a show and losing cheerfully.

Practice began in the fall of 1958 under our new coach. As one of his first orders of business, Donohue ordered new uniforms for the varsity team and evidently he had only two requirements for uniforms. They must be the right color and they must have the largest numbers possible, front and back.

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Can Fried Foods Increase the Risk of Prostate Cancer?

Written By Sofia Layarda, MPH

When you go to a drive-through or eat out at a fast food joint, what do you get? The typical fried items on a fast food menu are fries, doughnuts, or chicken strips. Variations exist, but certainly the prevailing generalization is that these items are deep-fried.
It’s not surprising that frequent consumption of deep-fried foods can seriously impact your weight in addition to having an undesirable effect on your cardiovascular health. A high-fat dietary pattern has also been linked to increased risk of several types of cancers.
Deep-Fried Foods May Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

Now researchers at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have also linked regular consumption of deep-fried foods to an increased risk of prostate cancer, specifically a more aggressive form of the cancer. They looked at men who ate deep-fried foods regularly. Specifically, the items were French fries, fried chicken, fried fish, doughnuts, and snack chips. Those who ate one or more servings of fries, fried chicken, or doughnuts per week had a 30% to 37% higher risk of prostate cancer than those who ate less than one serving per week.

 

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After breast cancer, high-fat dairy foods raise risk of death

by Sharon Begley

Women who have ever had breast cancer might want to walk away from the brie, the butter and the black cherry (and every other flavor) ice cream.

Electron Micrograph of a single breast cancer cellAccording to a study of 1,893 women, breast cancer survivors who average as little as one serving per day of high-fat dairy foods have a 49 percent higher risk of dying from breast cancer than those who eat little or no high-fat dairy.

In absolute terms, breast cancer survivors who consumed the most high-fat dairy had about a 12 percent risk of dying of the disease.

The elevated mortality risk is therefore “modest,” said lead author Candyce Kroenke, a staff scientist at Kaiser Permanente, the nonprofit healthcare provider. “But since it may not be so difficult to lower your consumption of high-fat dairy, I think if you have breast cancer it’s worthwhile.”

 

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Worth a Hill of Beans: Nutrition Powerhouses on Your Plate

 varities of beansIf you want to add color, flavor and nutrition to your meals, and not empty your wallet – read on. We spill the beans on an inexpensive, cancer-protective, global dietary staple much underused in the United States.

If you’re like many Americans, you likely only eat beans in chili, as baked beans or in “Tex-Mex” dishes such as burritos or enchiladas. But go beyond those dishes and you can find dozens of dry bean varieties that add color, nutrition and great flavor to every course in your meal.

Cooking with Beans: Convenient and Cost Effective

 

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